THE CHURCH

  
Faldingworth ALL SAINTS CHURCH is located on the A46 in the middle of Faldingworth village Lincolnshire. On memorial days it becomes a meeting point for people from all corners of the world . The church contains many items relating to those who served at RAF/PAF Faldingworth.
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
A memorial plaque in the Church's north aisle was dedicated on 29th APRIL 1995 in memory of the men and women of the Polish Air Force who served at Faldingworth  between 1944 and 1947 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CANDLESTICKS IN CHURCH WINDOW DONATED FROM Mr. FILIPOWICZ, P.A.F.A NEW YORK U.S.A. AND GIVEN BY THE P.A.F.A LONDON
  

A CABINET, MADE BY A LOCAL CRAFTSMAN, HAS A METAL 300 POLISH SQUADRON BADGE ON THE FRONT, THE BADGE WAS MADE IN A POLISH STEELWORKS AND DONATED TO THE CHURCH .THE CABINET IS PLACED IN FRONT OF THE STAINED GLASS WINDOW. IT CONTAINS TWO MEMORIAL BOOKS  CONTAINING OVER 150 PHOTOGRAPHS,AND OTHER ITEMS 

photo's copyright Richard E Flagg
 
 
25th September, 1999

Before the end of the millennium the plain glass window, by then known as the Polish window, was replaced with a new one of stained and painted glass designed and made by Glenn Carter of Washingborough.

The window has the following elements:-


Two crosses stand central in the main panels the one on the right representing the Christian community of Poland the one on the left Great Britain.

The ribbon flows back and forth around the Polish and British crosses, this represents the coming together of two peoples.

The rose and cornflower represent the people coming from their own country's soil and of love found and lost. Their position near the crosses representing the great sacrifices made.

Above all is the sunburst symbolizing the fact we are one people under one sun.
 
There is some sharpness in the shape of the sunburst depicting the pain and suffering not only of those long gone from this life, but also of those that were left behind.
There is the Polish Air Force chequerboard and the Royal Air Force roundel representing the
photo copyright Mike Ingham                                 Polish and British airmen and women.
The famous Polish words 'For our and your freedom' in English and Polish are on the ribbon
 
   
 Memorial Porch Outer Gates,

The gates commemorate the sacrifices made by the whole of 300 Polish Squadron right down to the individual. They commemorate the coming together of peoples to join in a common cause and in some cases the marriage of Polish and British men and women. Although many people, including the local RACol fund contributed, there was a main donor. Her father flew from Faldingworth and like so many had been a p.o.w. in the USSR and later shot down to be a p.o.w. in Germany. He married an English girl.

Her name was Beryl, his Henryk Jachacz, the initials BH are also the 300 Squadron letters.

 If you look through the gates when the inner doors are open, you will see the stained glass window framed in the outer gates.
The English side is on the West and so is the letter ‘B’ for Beryl.
The East side is Polish as Poland is East of Britain. Henryk was Polish and the letter ‘H’ is on the East side

 

 

The Gates design shows the RAF and PAF markings with the letters ‘BH’.

Above this the impression of the runway.

The arms sweep out from different parts of the world, Poland and Britain, to join in prayer as they pass through the door (depicted in the gates) into the next existence.

Wings carry one skyward for those who returned, with a half wing either side of the door for those who did not.

The gates were dedicated on Saturday 8th October 2005.


 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                                                                     gate photos copyright Richard E Flagg
 
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